Funny, But True Stories: Of All the Gin Joints

This story falls under the What Are the Odds? category. In this case, they were not in my favor. And I got busted.

My intentions were good. I had taken over a manufacturing company and was trying to save it from $1 million loss on one order. This company had one large client, responsible for 60 percent of its revenue. A discount mart, it provided the company with steady work and allowed it to grow significantly.

The discount mart even asked this company to change manufacturing capabilities to suit its needs, and because it was such a large customer, the company invested millions in upgrades so it could print T-shirts in several different ways for the discount mart. The investment seemed to be paying off. However, there was no written contract between the parties.

Until one day. The company had produced $1 million worth of branded/licensed T-shirts, just for this discount mart. Just prior to shipping the large order, the discount mart said, “No thanks.” That’s when the CEO knew he had a crisis, was reviewing his bankruptcy option and sought my help.

I told him it was a good thing he still had the merchandise and could do something with the T-shirts to cut his losses as there was no written contract he would be violating. But the discount mart wouldn’t have it. It was like an old lover. They don’t want you anymore, but they don’t want anyone else to have you either. If we did anything with those T-shirts, they’d say adios forever.

I figured we could still sell them in markets where this discount mart doesn’t compete, so we’d at least get 50 cents on the dollar. The strategy worked and we found a market in South America willing to buy the shirts for enough money to cover our costs and avoid a bankruptcy filing.

Everything would have been fine, except for one thing. The son of one of the discount mart executives vacationed in South America and bought dear old dad a souvenir T-shirt. You guessed it – one of those T-shirts. The discount mart made good on its threat and severed the relationship. I was able to keep the company out of a bankruptcy and the company sold six months later at a significantly reduced price.

The lesson here is about more than T-shirts, however. It’s about never becoming too reliant on a single customer, vendor or product – what I call the Big Gorilla. My rule is if a customer, vendor or product involves 25 percent or more of some part of your business, you’re dealing with the risks of a Big Gorilla…. sooner or later.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s